How Do You Use Apostrophes To Indicate Possession?

What does a possessive apostrophe look like?

The possessive form is used with nouns referring to people, groups of people, countries, and animals.

It shows a relationship of belonging between one thing and another.

To form the possessive, add apostrophe + s to the noun.

If the noun is plural, or already ends in s, just add an apostrophe after the s..

What is a possessive form examples?

It is clear that the pencil belongs to the boy; the ‘s signifies ownership. The cat’s toy was missing. The cat possesses the toy, and we denote this by use of an apostrophe + s at the end of cat. … Plural nouns ending in an s simply take an apostrophe at the end to form a possessive noun.

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

The modern rule is to always add ‘s even if the noun itself ends in an s or even a double s, e.g. child’s, Thomas’s, Ross’s. But the older rule for singular nouns ending is s, which you don’t see often today, but is still acceptable, is to ad only an apostrophe, e.g. Thomas’, Ross’.

What is a possessive apostrophe example?

An apostrophe used before the letter s to show ownership. For example, ‘This is Sally’s coat’.

What is correct James or James’s?

Commentary: both James’ birthday and James’s birthday are grammatically correct. Remember: it’s up to you! Use the version which best matches how you would pronounce it. Use James’s if you pronounce it “Jamesiz”, but use James’ if you pronounce it “James”.

What are the 3 Uses of apostrophe?

The apostrophe has three uses: 1) to form possessive nouns; 2) to show the omission of letters; and 3) to indicate plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols.

Where do we use apostrophes examples?

When using a singular noun, the apostrophe is used before the s. For example: “The squirrel’s nuts were stashed in a hollow tree.” When using a plural noun, the apostrophe goes after the s. For example: “The squirrels’ nuts were hidden in several hollow trees throughout the forest.”

Is it Chris’s or Chris ‘?

She wants to know why boss’s has an apostrophe and an s but Chris’ has only an apostrophe. The truth is that Chris takes just an apostrophe only if you follow the rules in the The Associated Press Stylebook. In other style guides, Chris takes an apostrophe and an s: Chris’s.

What does possession mean in apostrophes?

Apostrophes Showing Possession. Apostrophes Showing Possession. An apostrophe is normally used with the letter s to show ownership or possession. With most singular nouns, simply add an apostrophe plus the letter s to do this. An apostrophe plus s is never added to make a noun plural–even a proper noun.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•

What are the five steps for using the apostrophe correctly?

Five Steps in Using the Apostrophe Correctly.Look for possessive construction. Usually two nouns appear together. The first.Reverse the nouns using a prepositional phrase. Examine the ownership word.It the ownership word does NOT end in an “s” sound, add an apostrophe and.

How do you show possession with apostrophes?

Apostrophes to show possession can be shown by adding an apostrophe + ‘s’ (‘s) or just an apostrophe to the end of the noun. Rules vary depending on the type of noun (singular, plural, proper) and whether or not the noun already ends with an ‘s’.

Do you put an apostrophe to show ownership?

An apostrophe is a small punctuation mark ( ‘ ) placed after a noun to show that the noun owns something. The apostrophe will always be placed either before or after an s at the end of the noun owner. Always the noun owner will be followed (usually immediately) by the thing it owns.

What is a possessive example?

Possessive pronouns show that something belongs to someone. The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs. Possessive pronouns are never spelled with apostrophes.

Is it Williams or Williams’s?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends just an apostrophe: It’s Tennessee Williams’ best play. But most other authorities endorse ‘s: Williams’s. Williams’s means “belonging to Williams.” It is not the plural form of Williams. People’s names become plural the way most other words do.